TOP FIVE GREATEST FEUDS IN HISTORY!

Rodney King famously said, "Why can't we all just get along?"  Obviously, he never had to put up with that asshole Aaron Burr.  So today, we count down the Top 5 Greatest Feuds in History!

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#5) Liam vs. Noel Gallagher- possibly the greatest rock band feud of all time! 

From Complex.com:  

"During the 18 years that Oasis was a band, brothers Noel and Liam Gallagher, when not drinking, drugging and making outrageous statements to the press, bickered constantly. One imagines the fighting went back decades, but the first public signs emerged in 1996, when Liam refused to perform with Oasis at a taping of MTV Unplugged in England, opting to heckle the band from the balcony. He then refused to fly to America with Oasis, but joined the tour later and drunkenly acted out during a performance at the MTV VMAs, prompting Noel to fly back to England alone. The next dozen years proceeded similarly, with the two brothers constantly at odds as Liam’s substance abuse led to bar fights and botched or cancelled concerts. In 2009, Noel quit the band, issuing a statement that read in part, “I simply could not go on working with Liam a day longer.”

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#4) Alexander Hamilton vs. Aaron Burr

From ConstitutionCenter.org: 

"The final straw for Burr was a newspaper article that showed Hamilton trash-talking about Burr’s character. That wasn’t breaking news in 1804, but Burr then demanded  Hamilton apologize for 15 years of insults. Hamilton stayed quiet, so Burr demanded a duel.

Duels were common and both men had experience in them. In 1799, Burr dueled against Hamilton’s brother-in-law, John Church. This time, Burr and Hamilton met on the same Weehawken spot where Hamilton’s son died in an 1801 duel.

In most accounts, Hamilton shot first and missed, followed by Burr’s deadly shot. One theory, stated in a 1976 Smithsonian magazine article, is that Hamilton’s pistol had a hair trigger that let him get off the first shot. Per that theory, Hamilton had the drop on Burr and just missed the shot.

But Burr claimed in his autobiography that he supplied the pistols, and not Hamilton. And another report states each man brought their own weapons.

Hamilton died 36 hours after the duel from his wounds. His supporters claimed Burr had a chance to spare Hamilton, but Burr killed him in cold blood."

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#3) The 47 Ronin vs. Kira Yoshinaka

From best-top10-list.com

"In Samurai history, there's no a larger number of renowned story of feud than the story of the 47 Ronin, which has turned into one of Japan's most cherished bits of national fables. As the story goes, the quarrel initially started in the 1600s between Asano Nagonori, a primitive ruler, and Kira Yoshinaka, an authority who worked for the Shogun, the head military official in Japan. Kira was as far as anyone knows an impolite and cranky man, and its said he consistently slighted the more unflappable Asano. After rehashed abuse, Asano at last drew his sword and assaulted Kira, however he just succeeded in slicing the other's face before he was quelled and captured. For his wrongdoing, Asano was compelled to submit seppuku, a ceremonial suicide that is better referred to in the West as "hara-kiri." Asano's passing implied that his Samurai retainers had gotten to be Ronin—warriors without an expert or reason. Most went their different ways, however a gathering of 47 dependable parts, headed by Oishi Yoshio, pledged to retaliate for Asano's passing. How it Ended: Kira was attentive that the Ronin would attempt to look for vengeance, so they were compelled to lie in hold up for a year, deliberately disguising their thought processes by undertaking modest occupations and professing to be poor and undisciplined. In any case two years after Asano's demise, the Ronin at long last assaulted. They merged on Kira's manor, and in the wake of crushing a few opponent Samurai in battle, they discovered Kira groveling in a back room and murdered him by cutting off his head. They brought the head with them and set it on their expert Asano's tomb before turning themselves into the powers. In spite of the fact that they may have been successful in the quarrel, the 47 Ronin were still accused of homicide, and they were compelled to submit seppuku in the same manner as their expert."

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#2) Hatfields vs. McCoys 

From Wikipedia

"The Hatfield–McCoy feud (1863–1891) involved two families of the West VirginiaKentucky area along the Tug Fork of the Big Sandy River. The Hatfields of West Virginia were led by William Anderson "Devil Anse" Hatfield while the McCoys of Kentucky were under the leadership of Randolph "Ole Ran'l" McCoy. Those involved in the feud were descended from Ephraim Hatfield (born c. 1765) and William McCoy (born c. 1750). The feud has entered the American folklore lexicon as a metonym for any bitterly feuding rival parties. More than a century later, the feud has become synonymous with the perils of family honor, justice, and revenge."

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#1) Cain vs. Abel (the original feud)

From Wikipedia:

"Cain and Abel were, according to the Book of Genesis, two sons of Adam and Eve. Cain is described as a crop farmer and his younger brother Abel as a shepherd. Cain was the first human born and Abel was the first human to die. Cain committed the first murder by killing his brother. Interpretations of Genesis 4 by ancient and modern commentators have typically assumed that the motives were jealousy and anger. In the Cain and Abel story found in the Quran, the text refers to them simply as the sons of Adam"